Blog

From Willapa Bay, Washington Coast

Willapa Bay oysters were the first oyster to be harvested en masse starting back in 1850 when Willapa Bay was known as Shoalwater Bay. The oysters were marketed to San Francisco forty-niners, but by 1900 the stock was depleted. Today, most of these oysters are produced for the shucked market, but some are available on the half-shell and we have them this weekend!

Willapa Bay oysters are bottom cultured and have full, firm meats with a light brininess, sweet flavor and cucumber finish.

Flavor Profile: the classic Willapa flavor—lightly salty, sweetly cucumber, and delicate, as pure sea as you get in a Pacific oyster

From Chesapeake Bay – Barcat Oysters

Coming this weekend:

Barcat Oysters are medium in size, averaging 2 1/2 – 3″, and are native to the Chesapeake Bay. They are aquaculture grown by a co-op of former “wild” harvesters and small-time watermen from all across the Chesapeake Bay who are bound by a commitment to quality, sustainability, and environmental stewardship.

Flavor Profile: Very mild, but meaty. Salty start with a crisp, creamy, and slightly sweet finish.

This Weekend 5/18-5/19

Return of a favorite: Skuna Bay Salmon with a Pistachio-Herb-Panko Crust and our Champagne Citrus Beurre Blanc.

We’re also bringing back fresh Barramundi (Australian Sea Bass): Oven Roasted with a Black Garlic Pesto.

Flatiron USDA Choice cut: More Than Great Seafood!

Flatiron USDA Choice Cut

A flat muscle off the shoulder blade, sometimes called a petite tender or a top blade steak, the flatiron has been around for a long time—Cutting up in the Kitchen , a butchery book from the 1970s, includes a description of this cut in its list of beef cuts from the chuck primal. (That’s the whole front shoulder section of the cow, essentially.) But by 2007, food scientists devised a new way to cut the flatiron, working around the thick connective tissue that formerly ran down the center of the old-style flatiron cut. The result? A steak that’s super tender and full of flavor!

We Charbroil the Flatiron and serve it with our our homemade Chimichurri.

Back by overwhelming request: fresh Hawaiian Ono!

We will be preparing the Ono in what has become one of our guest favorite preparations; with a Macadamia Herb Panko Crust and our Champagne Citrus Beurre Blanc.

Ono fish gets its name from the Hawaiian word “ono” which means “good to eat”. It is closely related to King Mackerel and is marketed both as Ono and Wahoo fish.
Ono has mild-sweet tasting flesh with a firm texture, moderate fat, and large, circular flakes when cooked. Their flesh is a beautiful white color and remains white when cooked.

Ono is an excellent source of healthy, extra lean protein. It is also low in saturated fat and low in sodium. It is rich in niacin, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, phosphorus and selenium. Hawaii Wahoo also provides about 375 mg of omega-3’s (DHA and EPA) per 4 ounce serving of fresh fish.

Flying in Fresh Barramundi From Australia

Barramundi is a type of Sea Bass that’s native to Australia and the Indo-Pacific. Australia’s Aborigines dubbed this species Barramundi, meaning river fish with large scales; it spends most of its life in rivers, migrating to estuaries to breed and then returning to its original river system. It is internationally renowned for its deliciousness and versatility. Barramundi has a firm, moist texture and large flakes, this fish is prized for its sweet, buttery flavor.

We will be pan searing the Barramundi and serving it with a Fresh Fire Roasted Pineapple and Fresh Basil Salsa.

Back by popular request – Kumamoto Oysters, Fresh from South Puget Sound, WA

The Oyster Guide calls the Kumamoto the ‘Chardonnay of oysters’ and are among the most popular oyster due to their luscious fruity flavor and light brininess.
Kumamoto Oysters are deep-cupped with petite meats, have a mild brininess, sweet flavor and a honeydew finish. They are a favorite for both new oyster eaters and connoisseurs.
Kumamoto oysters originated in Yatsushiro Bay, Kumamoto Prefecture, Kyushu Japan and were shipped to the US in 1945. But strangly, even though they are extreemly popular in the US, they are unknown in Japan today. Kumos from California are cultivated by Inter-tidal Longlines while Kumos from Washington are culitvated with the Rack & Bag method.

Mother’s Day

We will be open on Mother’s Day from 10am to 7pm. We will be offering our Dinner Menu all day as well as these great featured dishes to celebrate Mom.

Petite Surf & Turf
5oz center cut choice Filet Mignon with a Cognac Dijon Sauce along side a 5oz cold water Lobster Tail poached in champagne butter.

Fresh Hawaiian Opah
Coated in a Macadamia Herb Panko Crust with our Champagne Citrus Beurre Blanc

Lobster Salad Roll
Sweet lobster meat mixed very, very lightly with celery, onions and parsley along with our butter Aioli on a traditional East Cost Split Bun.

King Crab Roll
King crab meat mixed very, very lightly with celery, onions and parsley along with our butter Aioli on a traditional East Cost Split Bun.

Crab Cake Sandwich
Our Blue Lump Crab Cake served on a Brioche Bun with romaine and our Citrus Rémoulade

And of course, expect very special desserts from our Pastry Chef Adrianna!

Make your Reservation today!

Flying in Fresh Hawaiian Ono

We will be preparing the Ono in what has become one of our guest favorite preparations; with a Macadamia Herb Panko Crust and our Champagne Citrus Beurre Blanc.

Ono fish gets its name from the Hawaiian word “ono” which means “good to eat”. It is closely related to King Mackerel and is marketed both as Ono and Wahoo fish.
Ono has mild-sweet tasting flesh with a firm texture, moderate fat, and large, circular flakes when cooked. Their flesh is a beautiful white color and remains white when cooked.

Ono is an excellent source of healthy, extra lean protein. It is also low in saturated fat and low in sodium. It is rich in niacin, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, phosphorus and selenium. Hawaii Wahoo also provides about 375 mg of omega-3’s (DHA and EPA) per 4 ounce serving of fresh fish.